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The Lone Bellow

The Lone Bellow

Friday, January 12, 2024

8pm | Doors open 7pm

Charline McCombs Empire Theatre

Just Announced: Liz Longley

Best known for her stop-you-in-your-tracks voice, Liz Longley is an accomplished singer-
songwriter based in Nashville, Tennessee. With her deeply emotional songs, Longley has
earned accolades from some of the most prestigious songwriting competitions in the country
and cultivated a following that enthusiastically supports the creation of her music.


In 2020, Longley's "Funeral For My Past" received widespread acclaim, with Forbes hailing it as
a "stunning new album." Billboard described it as spanning genres from Americana to gospel-
flavored soul to shimmering pop anthems. The album was also included in Newsweek's list of
"100 Albums Released in 2020 to Put on Your Radar.”


2024 brings a new release from Liz, "It's Me Again," an EP featuring acoustic remakes of
career-defining songs. Notably, among the revisited songs is "Unraveling," a track that
previously earned Longley the prestigious BMI John Lennon Scholarship Award. Fans eagerly
anticipate this next chapter in her career, alongside hints of an upcoming full-length record.

 

 

 


The Lone Bellow

 

Throughout their lifespan as a band, The Lone Bellow have cast an indelible spell with their finespun songs of hard truth and unexpected beauty, frequently delivered in hypnotic three-part harmony. In a departure from their past work with elite producers like Aaron Dessner of The National and eight-time Grammy-winner Dave Cobb, the Nashville-based trio struck out on their own for their new album Love Songs for Losers, dreaming up a singular sound encompassing everything from arena-ready rock anthems to the gorgeously sprawling Americana tunes the band refers to as “little redneck symphonies.” Recorded at the possibly haunted former home of the legendary Roy Orbison, the result is an intimate meditation on the pain and joy and ineffable wonder of being human, at turns heartbreaking, irreverent, and sublimely transcendent.

The fifth full-length from The Lone Bellow, Love Songs for Losers arrives as the follow-up to 2020’s chart-topping Half Moon Light—a critically acclaimed effort that marked their second outing with Dessner, spawning the Triple A radio hits “Count On Me” and “Dried Up River” (both of which hit #1 on the Americana Singles chart). After sketching the album’s 11 songs in a nearby church, the band holed up for eight weeks at Orbison’s house on Old Hickory Lake, slowly carving out their most expansive and eclectic body of work yet. “I’ve always thought our music was so much bigger than anything we’ve shown on record before, and this time we turned over every stone until we got the songs exactly where they needed to be,” says Elmquist. Co-produced by Elmquist and Jacob Sooter, Love Songs for Losers also finds Pipkin taking the reins as vocal producer, expertly harnessing the rarefied vocal magic they’ve brought to the stage in touring with the likes of Maren Morris and Kacey Musgraves. “Singing together night after night for a decade allows you to understand what your bandmates are capable of, in a way that no one else can,” says Pipkin. “There are so many different qualities to our voices that had never been captured before, and producing this album ourselves was a nice opportunity to finally showcase that.” 

For The Lone Bellow, the triumph of completing their first self-produced album marks the start of a thrilling new chapter in the band’s journey. “At the outset it was scary to take away the safety net of working with a big-name producer and lean on each other instead,” says Pipkin. “It took an incredible amount of trust, but in the end it was so exciting to see each other rise to new heights.” And with the release of Love Songs for Losers, the trio feel newly emboldened to create without limits. “This album confirmed that we still have beauty to create and put out into the world, and that we’re still having fun doing that after ten years together,” says Elmquist. “It reminded us of our passion for pushing ourselves out onto the limb and letting our minds wander into new places, and it sets me on fire to think of what we might make next.”